Interest Course

General Interest Courses from Absorb are a great way for your to boost your general knowledge on a certain subject.

If you are wanting to expand your mind and take on a new educational learning challenge then our range of online learning courses are for you.

Showing 1–16 of 18 results


  • Homer’s epic poem, The Iliad, taken from a previous A Level Classical Civilisation syllabus. The Iliad provides a unique insight into both Greek history and the formation of a Greek identity. The setting of the poem, the Trojan War, captured the imaginations of the Greek people and became the basis for a new history of a common people brought together by the war. This course is for anyone interested in studying the Iliad or it can also be studied alongside the current A Level Classical Civilisation course.

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  • Learn about the world’s fourth-largest religion in this course taken from the current A Level Religious Studies’ syllabus. Buddhism is becoming an increasingly popular religion that focuses on personal spiritual development with practices like mindfulness. Learn about the Four Noble Truths, The three Jewels, Buddhist texts, meditation, the Buddha’s life and more.

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  • This Introduction to Philosophy is taken from a previous A Level Philosophy syllabus and looks a knowledge (Epistemology), Moral Philosophy, Bentham’s Utility Calculus, Utilitarianism, Ethical Language, the metaphysics of God, The Philosophy of Religion, Metaphysics of Mind and Dualism. It includes theories from well-known philosophers: John Stuart Mill, Descartes, and Kant. This course is for anyone who wants to know more about philosophy or it can also be studied alongside the current A Level Philosophy course.

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  • Sign up for our online course on Chritianity

    What is this online course about?

    This Online Interest Course looks into the origins of Christianity and how the written word changed from an oral tradition into a written gospel. How are the gospels represented in the Bible? What can we learn about how the followers of Jesus – the Disciples – are shown in the Bible? This online course will help shine a light on many areas of the topic.

    The trial, death and subsequent resurrection of Jesus are major themes of this course as they are within the Bible itself. Whilst there remain differences in the divine nature of Jesus Christ, his role as a Prophet is very important.

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  • Sign up for our online course in Ancient Greek Art and Architecture

    What is this online course about?

    This online course is a great way to study online and learn about Ancient Greek Art and Architecture.  It is an overview of Ancient Greek art, including painting, sculpture and architecture, and a look at how it changed over the years. Ancient Greek art and culture have become cornerstones of modern western society. It remains present in popular culture and one can see its reiterations on film, art, architecture, and literature. However, throughout ancient Greek civilisation art underwent several distinct changes in medium, style, use, and accessibility.

    Greek architects provided some of the finest and most distinctive buildings in the entire Ancient World and some of their structures, such as temples, theatres, and stadia, would become staple features of towns and cities from antiquity onwards. In addition, the Greek concern with simplicity, proportion, perspective, and harmony in their buildings would go on to greatly influence architects in the Roman world and provide the foundation for the classical architectural orders which would dominate the western world from the Renaissance to the present day.

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  • Sign up for our online course studying Ancient Greek Religion

    What is this online course about?

    History shows that Greek religion was more a series of rituals than a code or moral behaviour as ritual and sacrifice were at its heart. Across the Greek empire, there was a strong belief among its people in fate. The Greeks tended to believe that there are no accidents: that the Gods were behind everything that happened in their lives. And like the Egyptians, the Greeks believed that consciousness resided in the heart, a view that would prevailed through the Middle Ages.

    The Greeks had no word for religion. There was no distinction between the sacred and secular: What we now call religion was intertwined with daily life and the state. Greek religion often placed the ideals of beauty and heroics on a higher level than those for morality. The Gods were more often than not are seen as being that could enjoy and indulge themselves in things beyond the means of mortals rather than beings that guided humans and rewarded and punished them on the basis of their righteousness or sins.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course on Descartes and ‘Dualism’

    What is this online course about?

    One of the deepest and most lasting legacies of Descartes’ philosophy is his thesis that mind and body are really distinct—a thesis now called “mind-body dualism.” He reaches this conclusion by arguing that the nature of the mind (that is, a thinking, non-extended thing) is completely different from that of the body (that is, an extended, non-thinking thing), and therefore it is possible for one to exist without the other.

    This argument gives rise to the famous problem of mind-body causal interaction still debated today: how can the mind cause some of our bodily limbs to move (for example, raising one’s hand to ask a question), and how can the body’s sense organs cause sensations in the mind when their natures are completely different?

    Taken from our online A Level Philosophy Course

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Epistemology

    What is this online course about?

    Who am I? Outside of philosophy, ‘personal identity’ usually refers to properties to which we feel a special sense of attachment or ownership. Someone’s personal identity in this sense consists of those properties she takes to “define her as a person” or “make her the person she is”, and which distinguish her from others.

    Personhood. What is it to be a person, as opposed to a nonperson? What have we people got that nonpeople haven’t got? More specifically, we can ask at what point in our development from a fertilized egg there comes to be a person, or what it would take for a chimpanzee or a Martian or an electronic computer to be a person, if they could ever be.

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  • Sign up for our online course in Ethics and Moral Philosophy

    What is this online course about?

    This short Online Interest Course covers the main arguments within Philosophy with a key focus on the Ethics side. It covers a range of key thinkers famous in this subject ranging from Aristotle and St Thomas Aquinas all the way up to more recent thinkers like Hobbes and Kant. There is an element of where one’s own pleasure is limited by its impact on other people and how we can avoid damaging others in pursuit of our own goals. Is it more ethical to pursue the greatest good for the greatest number of people?

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  • This course is taken from a previous A Level Philosophy syllabus and looks at the free will versus determinism debate. Is your behaviour the result of forces over which you have no control or are you able to decide for yourself whether to act or behave in a certain way? This course is for anyone with an interest in Philosophy or it can also be studied alongside the current A Level Philosophy course.

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  • Sign up for our online course and learn about Greek Tragedy

    What is this online course about?

    This online course is all about Greek tragedies.  They were a form of theatre written and performed in 5th Century B.C. Greece to honour the God Dionysius.

    The playwrights behind the tragedy

    The three most famous playwrights were Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus who competed in and won competitions every year. Traditionally, Greek tragedies were trilogies, with each play ending in a moment of catharsis experienced by the protagonist. Unfortunately, except for one, no complete trilogy has survived. The tragedies included in this Online Interest Course are The Agamemnon, Medea, Sophocles’ Electra and the classic Sophocles’ play Antigone.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Homer’s Odyssey

    What is The Odyssey of Homer?

    The Odyssey of Homer is a Greek epic poem that tells of the return journey of Odysseus to the island of Ithaca from the war at Troy, which Homer addressed in The Iliad. In the Greek tradition, the war lasted for ten years. Odysseus then spent a further ten years getting home in the face of hostility from Poseidon, god of the earth and sea.

    Odysseus’s return to his island, however, is not the end of his woes. He finds that 108 young men from the local vicinity have invaded his house to put pressure on his wife Penelope to marry one of them. A stalemate exists, and it is only resolved by a bow contest at the end of the poem, which then leads to a slaughter of all the suitors by Odysseus and his son Telemachus. Peace on the island is eventually restored through the intervention of Athena, goddess of wisdom, victory and war.

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  • Sign up for our online course in Israel & Palestine

    What is this online course about?

    This short Online Interest Course covers the history of the founding of Israel, the early wars in the region as well as the impact on Palestinians. This leads into a look at the modern Arab-Israeli conflict. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the world’s longest-running and most controversial conflicts. At its heart, it is a conflict between two self-determination movements — the Jewish Zionist project and the Palestinian nationalist project — that lay claim to the same territory. From a nation born from the Holocaust to a people fighting for civil rights. In the modern era the relationship between Israel and Palestine is characterised as either an ‘Occupation’ or as a ‘Fight against terrorism’ with distrust and fear ruling on both sides.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Personhood

    What is this online course about?

    Who am I? Outside of philosophy, ‘personal identity’ usually refers to properties to which we feel a special sense of attachment or ownership. Someone’s personal identity in this sense consists of those properties she takes to “define her as a person” or “make her the person she is”, and which distinguish her from others.

    Personhood. What is it to be a person, as opposed to a nonperson? What have we people got that nonpeople haven’t got? More specifically, we can ask at what point in our development from a fertilized egg there comes to be a person, or what it would take for a chimpanzee or a Martian or an electronic computer to be a person, if they could ever be.

    Sale!
  • Sign up for our online interest course looking at Philosophy of Religion

    What is this online course about?

    One of the deepest and most lasting legacies of Descartes’ philosophy is his thesis that mind and body are really distinct—a thesis now called “mind-body dualism.” He reaches this conclusion by arguing that the nature of the mind (that is, a thinking, non-extended thing) is completely different from that of the body (that is, an extended, non-thinking thing), and therefore it is possible for one to exist without the other.

    This argument gives rise to the famous problem of mind-body causal interaction still debated today: how can the mind cause some of our bodily limbs to move (for example, raising one’s hand to ask a question), and how can the body’s sense organs cause sensations in the mind when their natures are completely different?

    Sale!
  • Sign up for our online interest course in Virgil’s Aeneid

    What is this online course about?

    The Aeneid by the Roman poet Virgil is an epic poem in 12 books that tells the story of the foundation of Rome from the ashes of Troy. It was probably written down in Rome from 30-19 BC during the period of the Emperor Augustus.

    The poem is named after the Trojan hero Aeneas, the son of Venus (Aphrodite in Greek mythology) and Anchises, a Trojan aristocrat. Aeneas leads the survivors from the sack of Troy through the Mediterranean, and ultimately to the site of (future) Rome. The Aeneid is therefore a classic foundation narrative.

    As with other ancient epics, our hero has to remain resolute in the face of significant divine hostility. Juno, queen of heaven and goddess of marriage, despises the Trojans because she lost a divine beauty contest known as the Judgement of Paris. Venus wins the Judgement by giving a bribe to Paris, a Trojan prince who acts as judge. The bribe is in the form of Helen of Sparta, the most beautiful woman in the world. Paris prefers this bribe to the bribes of the other two contestants – Juno and Minerva.

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Showing 1–16 of 18 results

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