Our Range of Courses

Showing 113–121 of 121 results


  • This course is taken from a previous A Level Philosophy syllabus and looks at the free will versus determinism debate. Is your behaviour the result of forces over which you have no control or are you able to decide for yourself whether to act or behave in a certain way? This course is for anyone with an interest in Philosophy or it can also be studied alongside the current A Level Philosophy course.

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  • Sign up for our online course and learn about Greek Tragedy

    What is this online course about?

    This online course is all about Greek tragedies.  They were a form of theatre written and performed in 5th Century B.C. Greece to honour the God Dionysius.

    The playwrights behind the tragedy

    The three most famous playwrights were Sophocles, Euripides, and Aeschylus who competed in and won competitions every year. Traditionally, Greek tragedies were trilogies, with each play ending in a moment of catharsis experienced by the protagonist. Unfortunately, except for one, no complete trilogy has survived. The tragedies included in this Online Interest Course are The Agamemnon, Medea, Sophocles’ Electra and the classic Sophocles’ play Antigone.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Homer’s Odyssey

    What is The Odyssey of Homer?

    The Odyssey of Homer is a Greek epic poem that tells of the return journey of Odysseus to the island of Ithaca from the war at Troy, which Homer addressed in The Iliad. In the Greek tradition, the war lasted for ten years. Odysseus then spent a further ten years getting home in the face of hostility from Poseidon, god of the earth and sea.

    Odysseus’s return to his island, however, is not the end of his woes. He finds that 108 young men from the local vicinity have invaded his house to put pressure on his wife Penelope to marry one of them. A stalemate exists, and it is only resolved by a bow contest at the end of the poem, which then leads to a slaughter of all the suitors by Odysseus and his son Telemachus. Peace on the island is eventually restored through the intervention of Athena, goddess of wisdom, victory and war.

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  • Sign up for our online course in Israel & Palestine

    What is this online course about?

    This short Online Interest Course covers the history of the founding of Israel, the early wars in the region as well as the impact on Palestinians. This leads into a look at the modern Arab-Israeli conflict. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the world’s longest-running and most controversial conflicts. At its heart, it is a conflict between two self-determination movements — the Jewish Zionist project and the Palestinian nationalist project — that lay claim to the same territory. From a nation born from the Holocaust to a people fighting for civil rights. In the modern era the relationship between Israel and Palestine is characterised as either an ‘Occupation’ or as a ‘Fight against terrorism’ with distrust and fear ruling on both sides.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Personhood

    What is this online course about?

    Who am I? Outside of philosophy, ‘personal identity’ usually refers to properties to which we feel a special sense of attachment or ownership. Someone’s personal identity in this sense consists of those properties she takes to “define her as a person” or “make her the person she is”, and which distinguish her from others.

    Personhood. What is it to be a person, as opposed to a nonperson? What have we people got that nonpeople haven’t got? More specifically, we can ask at what point in our development from a fertilized egg there comes to be a person, or what it would take for a chimpanzee or a Martian or an electronic computer to be a person, if they could ever be.

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  • Sign up for our online interest course looking at Philosophy of Religion

    What is this online course about?

    One of the deepest and most lasting legacies of Descartes’ philosophy is his thesis that mind and body are really distinct—a thesis now called “mind-body dualism.” He reaches this conclusion by arguing that the nature of the mind (that is, a thinking, non-extended thing) is completely different from that of the body (that is, an extended, non-thinking thing), and therefore it is possible for one to exist without the other.

    This argument gives rise to the famous problem of mind-body causal interaction still debated today: how can the mind cause some of our bodily limbs to move (for example, raising one’s hand to ask a question), and how can the body’s sense organs cause sensations in the mind when their natures are completely different?

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  • Sign up for our online interest course in Virgil’s Aeneid

    What is this online course about?

    The Aeneid by the Roman poet Virgil is an epic poem in 12 books that tells the story of the foundation of Rome from the ashes of Troy. It was probably written down in Rome from 30-19 BC during the period of the Emperor Augustus.

    The poem is named after the Trojan hero Aeneas, the son of Venus (Aphrodite in Greek mythology) and Anchises, a Trojan aristocrat. Aeneas leads the survivors from the sack of Troy through the Mediterranean, and ultimately to the site of (future) Rome. The Aeneid is therefore a classic foundation narrative.

    As with other ancient epics, our hero has to remain resolute in the face of significant divine hostility. Juno, queen of heaven and goddess of marriage, despises the Trojans because she lost a divine beauty contest known as the Judgement of Paris. Venus wins the Judgement by giving a bribe to Paris, a Trojan prince who acts as judge. The bribe is in the form of Helen of Sparta, the most beautiful woman in the world. Paris prefers this bribe to the bribes of the other two contestants – Juno and Minerva.

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  • fascinating study of St. John’s Gospel taken from a previous A Level Religious Studies’ syllabus. St. John’s Gospel is a mystical reflection on the Word Made Flesh, Jesus Christ. This theologically profound Gospel is composed by the beloved disciple John, who dined next to Jesus at the Last Supper. It gives a fresh depiction of the life, passion, death, and Resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth.

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  • Learn about how the Bible’s three synoptic gospels (Mathew, Mark and Luke) paint three portraits of Jesus in this course taken from a previous A Level Religious Studies’ syllabus. While each gospel follows him on the same journey, they recount it a little differently. Each had their own methods, styles, purposes, audiences and sources—making each portrait of Jesus uniquely valuable.

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